SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI AT MĀNOA

December 11, 2016

AIAS National Recognizes UH Paper Architecture Night

Image 007

AIAS Hawaii

Paper Architecture Night
AIAS and AIAS Hawaii

AIAS has recognized the Hawaii chapter for our Paper Architecture Night with a great article on their website. For four years and running PAN has been a monthly staple of the Hawaii chapter, bringing students and professionals together in the School of Architecture courtyard for presentations, socializing and food. Congrats to all the members, past members and supporters of this highly active chapter who help keep PAN and the Hawaii chapter a success. 

December 7, 2016

Giant inflatable structures give students valuable experience

Image Screen Shot 2017-07-19 at 12.05.22 PM

Lance Walters

Giant inflatable structures, some two stories tall, took over part of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa campus at the end of the 2016 fall semester. It is the fourth straight year the inflatable, or pneumatic, structures popped up in the lawn between the School of Architecture and Hawaiʻi Hall.

The pneumatic structures were designed and built by 43 students taking Architecture 235, a second-year design studio course. The structures were made of sheets of plastic the students seamed together with soldering irons and clothing irons. Everyday household standing fans inflated the structures.

“Typically, in design school and architecture school, you don’t get to build full size projects,” said UH Mānoa architecture professor Lance Walters, who teaches the course. “This project involves designing through representation and then constructing them. This gives them a chance to learn more about the spaces they are actually designing.”

“It’s a different experience to actually see something built,” said UH Mānoa architecture student Keola Annino, who built on one of the seven structures, which were one to two stories high. “We’re only in our second year, first semester of our second year, so having the opportunity to build something is pretty awesome.”

The assignment was to create pop-up galleries to display projects from earlier in the semester. The projects on display were of schematic designs, the first phase of basic design. The students used technical drawings, computer renderings and collages to rethink and conceptualize lifeguard towers.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL ARTICLE

December 13, 2016

2016 Spatial Explorations Design Competition

Competition and Jury Event on September 29, 2016

Arch 101 Basic Design Studio

1st year BEnvD

The first year basic design studio displayed over 500 models that explored a variety of materials, volumetric operations and spatial qualities for the inaugural “Spatial Explorations Design Competition”. Each student presented one drawing, eight models and a brief description of their investigation. A jury of guest critics selected three noteworthy projects. The first prize was awarded to: “Square Splendor” by Reid Kaneshiro. Nathan Nishimura received the second award with his project titled “Flux” and “Incomplete Cubes” by Sean Nada received third prize.

The students were guided by Assistant Professor Karla Sierralta together with Teaching Assistants Vincent Au, Matthew Kubota and Jayna McClaran.

SierraltaDesign CompetitionIMAGE1.png

Selected Student Models

October 31, 2016

Conceptual Design of Kupu Youth Facility Published on Mānoa Horizons Journal

Image Concept

Kristoffer Jugueta

4th year BEnvD candidate

Kristoffer Jugueta’s creative work research is one of twenty undergraduate student works featured in the inaugural issue of Mānoa Horizons, Vol. 1, Fall 2016.  Mānoa Horizons is a peer-reviewed academic journal that showcases high-quality research, creativity, and innovation produced by undergraduate students at UH Mānoa.

 

During his third year in the architecture program, an assignment, in Assistant Professor Wendy Meguro’s Arch 314-Intermediate Design Studio, was “to conceptually design both environmentally friendly architecture and urban landscape located on Honolulu’s coastline at Kewalo Basin.” Kris learned “that the value of design has the potential to solve many of today’s issues when incorporating problems like climate change, the social environment and the preservation of cultural values during the attentive design process. The project expresses the importance of human life by providing opportunities for the community to learn, serve, and restore.” 

See more of the published work in the link below.

Landscape.jpg
Landscape Design


Building.jpg
Architectural Building Design

October 26, 2016

Grand Prize Award: Internship and $1000

Image ParkBLTaImage1

Joo-Hyun Park

DArch Candidate

JooHyun Park receives the Grand Prize -- paid internship in summer 2017 at BLT Architects (BLTa) and a $1000 prize award --for his entry in the BLTa 2016 Student Design Competition.  His award winning project entitled, “Vault Shaped Housing” provides unique experiences for retail and public spaces, including a variety of unit types for single and family dwellers. He  incorporated prefabricated systems, the focus of his doctoral thesis, and precast concrete in his design, which complements the riverside historical bridge and captures the city’s rich history 

 

BLT Architects, Inc. is a Chicago-based architectural firm specializing in the evaluation and renovation and repair of existing commercial and residential buildings. This is the 6th year that BLTa invited undergraduate and graduate architecture students to propose imaginative design ideas for a real-world building site. This year’s challenge was to create a mixed use development for an underutilized riverfront site in a Philadelphia business district, at the foot of a unique historic bridge on the Schuylkill River, 

 

JooHyun values the guidance he received from Professor David Rockwood.

 

ParkBLTaImage2.jpg

October 17, 2016

2016 Nupath Sculpture Competition - Third Place Winner

Image first-three-houses-built-copy

Joo-Hyun Park

DArch Candidate

Joo-Hyun Park, third year doctoral candidate, was awarded third place in the recent NuPath Sculpture Competition for his design entitled, “Demountable Box.”  This prefab wood structure is constructed with CNC cut recycled lumber and connected with steel rods.  The box-shaped design allows for assembling, dissembling, and re-assembling into an assortment of pleasurable socializing configurations providing for unique experiences in a revitalized outdoor space.  It also serves as an art piece with the idea of memorializing loved ones, with elements of sustainability and creative installation.  His third place award included a $200 prize.

 

The Nupath Sculpture competition provided the opportunity for art and architecture students to collaborate in designing a single sculpture or installation to provide people with disabilities the support needed to live, work, learn, grow and participate to their fullest potential in their communities.  The awarded design concepts and ideas have the potential of being built in the later phases of the currently planned Outdoor Sculpture Park on New Boston Street in Woburn, MA.

 

NuPath Inc. is a leader in the human services arena, providing a network of creative day services and residential options for people living with developmental disabilities, autism spectrum disorders and acquired brain injury.

 

Joo-Hyun credits his work from the advice he received from Professor David Rockwood.

PARKNupathSculptureIMAGE2.jpg

PARKNupathSculptureImage3.jpg

October 12, 2016

SoA hosts national conference on design + health

Image news1

Sara Jensen Carr

Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor Sara Jensen Carr recently co-chaired a national joint conference for the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture and the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health, focused on the topic of design and health. Titled “Building for Health and Well-Being: Structures Cities Systems” this conference was the first such joint conference between the two entities.

 

Hosted at the East-West Center at the UH Manoa campus, and with co-chairs Billie Faircloth, partner at Kieran Timberlake, and Dr. Howard Frumkin, immediate past dean of the School of Public Health at University of Washington, Professor Carr welcomed 50+ presentations focused on research on built environment and public health and its applications to pedagogy, design, and policy. Topics ranged from studies on healthy food access to improving hospital design to youth environments.

 

The opening night of the conference welcomed Healoha Johnston, curator of Arts of Hawai’i at the Honolulu Museum of Art, to speak about Native Hawaiian culture and its influence on Honolulu’s built environment. The second night welcomed three keynote speakers: Steven Luoni, director of the University of Arkansas Community Design Center, John Bela, director at Gehl Studio, and Dr. Bon Ku, MD, emergency physician and Associate Professor at Thomas Jefferson University. In a discussion moderated by Dean Daniel Friedman of the School of Architecture, the three panelists discussed the role of design and design thinking in improving the well-being of communities.

 

Mahalo to our guest co-chairs, ACSA, ASPPH, and all our presenters and speakers for traveling to Honolulu and making this conference so memorable!

More Photos:


Traci Rider of North Carolina State University presents “Exploring Opportunities at the Intersection of Design and Public Health Pedagogies.


John Bela, Bon Ku, and Steve Luoni discuss the role of design in healthier communities


Dr. Bon Ku and Stephanie Carlisle present their collaboration to map a better emergency department


John Bela of Gehl Architects presents at Building for Health and Well-Being: Structures Cities Systems

October 10, 2016

Parklet is Re-Built in the Courtyard

Image Parklet2016Image1

Mike Poscablo, Chris Songvilay, Christian Simafranca, Chris Gaydosh, Kris Juguetta, Melise Nekoba, Keola Annino, Eva Constantino

Cathi Ho Schar, director, HIDESIGN Studio

Park(ing) Day is an annual event which occurs worldwide on the third Friday in September to temporarily transform metered parking spaces into temporary public mini parks and gathering places. The mission of Park(ing) Day is to call attention to the need for more urban open space, and to generate critical debate on how urban space is created and allocated for public use.  

 

A group of mixed year UHM architecture students collaboratively designed and built a Parklet out of recycled pallets and PVC parts.  On Friday, 9/16/16 students assembled and installed a system of seating, swings, tables, platforms, planters, and shading on Auahi Street, Kaka‘ako, in front of Paiko.  At the conclusion of the event, the Parklet was disassembled and rebuilt the next day in the School of Architecture courtyard for students to gather for group meetings and to enjoy & relax between classes.

ʻŌLELO

MAKANI

WIKIWIKI

KAI

AKUA

LEI

AHI

KALO

IKI

MAKANA

KAHUNA

LIMU

MAHINA

POLŪ

ALANUI

‘OLI

KĪ / LAʻI

HELE

MELE

MAUNA

MOKU

KĀNE

ʻULAʻULA

KAPU

POKE

MAUI

HINAHINA

ʻAHI

ʻAE

NAIʻA

MOKULELE

HĀLAU

WAI

MAIKA‘I

NIU

NI‘IHAU

PALI

MAU LOA

KOKUA

KEʻOKEʻO

HEIAU

LOA

ʻĀKALA

MANAKŌ

KAHO‘OLAWE

LANI

WAIWAI

KOHOLĀ

HUI

UILA

AKAMAI

HOKU

MOʻOPUNA

ʻULU

HULI

PAU

MOʻO

AO

HO‘OPONO

MANA‘O

POKO

AHU

HEMA

ʻILIʻILI

‘ĀINA

‘ONO

KAMA‘ĀINA

KAHAWAI

PONI

KUKUI

WAHINE

HAPA

ʻAKAU

ʻŌLENA

ʻŌ ʻŌ

ĀNUENUE

‘UKULELE

KOMOHANA

PAʻAKAI

ʻUALA

MAKUA

HONU

MAIʻA

IMU

MĀLAMA

ʻŌHIʻAʻAI

MAHALO

NANI

AHUPUA‘A

ʻUPENA

NAʻAU

MOKUPUNI

KUPUNA

NALU

INOA

NAHELE

UA