SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI AT MĀNOA

October 8, 2017

The Albizia Project at Hawaii's Woodshow

Installation at Honolulu Museum of Art School

Joseph Valenti

D.Arch

Feature Image: Installation at Honolulu Museum of Art School

This year Hawaii's Woodshow is featuring The Albizia Project at the Honolulu Museum of Art School (HoMAS). The first full-scale structural arch of Protoype 1 is on display on the HoMAS lawn and a scale model is in the HoMAS lobby. This installation ties into the educational component of the event, as the structural arch was built during the Summer ARCH490 Digital Build course led by Joseph Valenti and Steven Hill. 

On Sunday October 8th at 3pm, Joseph Valenti co-host a public presentation with Matthew K Lynch, UH System Sustainability Coordinator as the closing reception for the Woodshow. Refreshments will be served as they end with a discussion around the structural arch and scale model – admission is free.


Scale model in HoMAS Lobby


Initial lifting of arch at SOA


Summer ARCH 490 class at SOA




www.thealbiziaproject.com
http://woodshow.hawaiiforest.org

September 29, 2017

Students Excel in Innovation + Imagination Challenge

Kris Jugueta and Cale Okamoto congratulated by Steven Hill

Steven Hill, IDSA

Feature Image: Kris Jugueta and Cale Okamoto congratulated by Steven Hill

Kris Jugueta (DArch candidate) and Cale Okamoto (BEnvD '17) earned first and third place in the newly minted Innovation+Imagination Student Design Challenge.  The new competition launches this year in conjunction with the 25th anniversary of Hawaii's Woodshow.  The exhibitions continue a long tradition of strengthening Hawaii's forests and promoting the use of Hawaiian-grown tree species.  For the competition, high school and university students were supplied with similar bundles of donated local woods and challenged to create their own original designs.  Jugueta and Okamoto designed their entries in ARCH490 electives led by Lance Walters and Steven Hill respectively.  The exhibition can be seen at the Honolulu Art Museum School, Linekona Gallery through October 8th.  Admission is free. 


"Iris Monkeypod" by Kris Jugueta

 

September 25, 2017

2017 AIA Honolulu Student Design Awards

School of Architecture at the AIA Honolulu Design Awards Gala

SoA

Back row (from left to right): Sho Tetsutani, Jay Morman, Christopher Songvilay,Cathi Ho Schar,  B. Keolamaikaʻi Annino, Khoa Nguyen, Valerie Ribao, Jason Hashimoto, Kristoffer Jugueta, Brian Strawn, Chloe Bennie, Josephine (Jojo) Briones, Mike Poscablo, Kenneth Guillen

Front row (from left to right: Akira Ishikawa, Elliot Lazo, Rubin Intong, Siraj Sherrif, Melise Nekoba, Katherine Pananganan, Christina Holcom, Karla Sierralta, Jonathan Quach, Joyce Noe


Congratulations to all students who submitted for this year's AIA Honolulu Student Design Awards, with special recognition to the following winning projects and entrants:
 

Award of Excellence - Graduate Level
"Anuenue Gymnasium" - Christopher Songvilay, Akira Ishikawa "The Bridge" - Danalli Ignacio, Christopher Songvilay, Sho Tetsutani

Award of Merit - Graduate Level
"Rebirth"- Rubinson Intong, Jay Moorman, Melise Nekoba

Award of Excellence - Undergraduate Level "Rise with Nature" - Kristopher Jugueta "Push/Pull Tower"- Khoa Nguyen

Award of Merit - Undergraduate Level "Urban Market"- Christina Holcom 

September 18, 2017

‘Design Islands’, the SOA’s interactive Traveling Exhibit System is recognized with a 2017 AIA Honolulu Design Award.

Design Islands featured at the Hawaii State Capitol on Earth Day

Karla Sierralta & Brian Strawn

Building Voices Competition and Exhibition Co-Chairs

The American Institute of Architects, Honolulu Chapter presented the 2017 AIA Honolulu Design Award: ‘Honorable Mention, Institutional’ to the project: ‘Design Islands, Interactive Traveling Exhibit System’. 

Originally designed for the inaugural 2017 Building Voices event held the Hawaii State Capitol, ‘Design Islands’ is a traveling exhibit system inspired by the stick charts utilized by early Marshal Island navigators to traverse the waters of Polynesia. 

‘Design Islands’ was built by students, and was imagined as a spatial component of the identity of the School of Architecture. It is a tiny project, hoping to make a big impact. It is more than just a framework to display artwork. It is an interactive, graphic, spatial construct, an urban installation, and a space-making device. Most importantly it is meant to bring people together to celebrate architecture and design in Hawaii.

 


Design Islands Installation


Design Islands Building Voices


Design Islands Welcomes the Hōkūleʻa


Design Islands Design Process


Design Islands Team Members

September 13, 2017

DArch Projects on ScholarSpace

Image SCHRAYimage1

Hyoung-June Park

Director of Graduate Programs

ScholarSpace at the University of Hawaii is an open-access, digital resource for intellectual research and publications.  This Digital Institutional Repository has the collection of doctoral projects from the UH Manoa School of Architecture, currently from 2007-2016.  There are 260 theses available to discover through the author's name, subject/key terms, and year.  Additionally, each one contains the document for view/download, faculty advisor's name, and full abstract.  This academic resource will allow for a permanent "hard url" to share publicly and add to webpages. ScholarSpace will continue to be updated. 

Design Futures Laboratory developed the project as a part of its continuous efforts for establishing the intellectual repository and resilient interface for our future. The lab is directed by Professor Emeritus Raymond Yeh and Associate Professor Hyoung-June Park. As one of research assistants at the lab, Julia Schray, first year D.Arch. candidate, played a key role in this project with her volition "as accessibility to academia can provide knowledge for those interested in progressive architectural theory and application". 

https://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/45358?subject_page=0

August 24, 2017

D.Arch. Project Receives the 2017 APA Hawaii Annual Chapter Award

Ka Mala Lani: Re-Planning School Grounds for Growing Pono

Alberto Ricordi

D. Arch., ASLA Associate, SITES AP; Landscape Designer at PBR Hawaii & Associates, Inc..

Alberto Ricordi (D.Arch. '15), Blanche Pope Elementary School, and the UHM School of Architecture were selected as recipients of the 2017 APA Hawaii Chapter Student Project, for the D.Arch. project "Ka Mala Lani: Re-Planning School Grounds for Growing Pono". In his D.Arch. dissertation, Ricordi developed a participatory design method based on the school garden “Ka Mala Lani” concepts of “growing pono” (in righteousness) and pu'uhonua (place of refuge). The school’s largely Native Hawaiian student population often struggles in passive academic settings, but is able to find refuge and healing in the “Ka Mala Lani” garden.  His master plan, consisting of a site plan and design solutions for Blanche Pope Elementary School, addresses not only environmental and resource management issues, but also social and educational goals for the school’s students. The school has successfully used the master plan as a tool to form community partnerships to implement three major projects, of which Ricordi has been an integral part of: a rain garden, led by Hui o Ko'olau Poko; a lilikoi hale and school garden improvements, through a Green Apple Day of Service event led by HHF Planners and USGBC Hawaii; and the “Garden of Eden” wellness pathway, led by PBR Hawaii and funded by Kaulunani Urban and Forestry Program. These projects and the master plan have been used by teachers to fulfill STEM curriculum standards and have the potential to strengthen community empowerment, identity, and self-sufficiency, bringing a UH SoA doctoral project from vision to reality for the benefit of local community.

DARCH and Community Projects PDF

August 1, 2017

Ratios from the Intersections of 10 + 1 Proportionalities

Image image001

Hyoung-June Park, Ph.D.

Nexus Network Journal, April 2017, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 145–154

His paper titled “Ratios from the Intersections of 10 + 1 Proportionalities” was published in Nexus Network Journal, April 2017, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 145–154. The following is its abstract excerpted from Springer website (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00004-016-0328-2)

“An innovative mathematical analysis comparing sets of preferred ratios from authors from antiquity (Vitruvius), the Renaissance (Alberti, Serlio and Palladio), and the modern age (Fechner and Lalo) with the eleven unique and universal proportionalities sheds new light on architects’ use of certain ratios to endow their creations with commensurability and beauty. Some ratios may provide more ways of representing three magnitudes, and this might provide a clue to their enduring appearance in architectural works.”




(Projected graph to show ratios from the intersections of 10 + 1 proportionalities)

April 1, 2017

Design Exchange: Peace Memorial

Image Arch-490_Peace-Memorial1GroupAtNID

Karla Sierralta

Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor Karla Sierralta, together with her students: Calvin Bulan, Jason Hashimoto, Khan Meyer, Valerie Ribao, Malu Stanich and Morgan Wynne traveled to Japan and participated in a cultural and academic exchange with the Nagaoka Institute of Design. Students from both institutions collaborated and presented design proposals during an intensive two-week workshop that took place in both Nagaoka and Honolulu. The exchange was rooted on the recent commemoration of the 70th anniversary of peace between the nations of Japan and the United States and focused on the design of a dual physical memorial for sites in both cities celebrating this friendship and paving the way for future generations to embrace world peace.


NID Professor Seisuke Watanabe explains the sites in Nagaoka

Arch-490_Peace-Memorial3WorkshopCollaborationAtNID.jpg
Students collaborate during design workshop in Japan

Arch-490_Peace-MemorialDesign4PresentationAtNID.jpg
Students present their design work at NID

Arch-490_Peace-MemorialDesign5PresentationAtCharlot.jpg
Final student presentations at Charlot House in Honolulu

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