SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI AT MĀNOA

August 1, 2017

Ratios from the Intersections of 10 + 1 Proportionalities

Image image001

Hyoung-June Park, Ph.D.

Nexus Network Journal, April 2017, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 145–154

His paper titled “Ratios from the Intersections of 10 + 1 Proportionalities” was published in Nexus Network Journal, April 2017, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 145–154. The following is its abstract excerpted from Springer website (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00004-016-0328-2)

“An innovative mathematical analysis comparing sets of preferred ratios from authors from antiquity (Vitruvius), the Renaissance (Alberti, Serlio and Palladio), and the modern age (Fechner and Lalo) with the eleven unique and universal proportionalities sheds new light on architects’ use of certain ratios to endow their creations with commensurability and beauty. Some ratios may provide more ways of representing three magnitudes, and this might provide a clue to their enduring appearance in architectural works.”




(Projected graph to show ratios from the intersections of 10 + 1 proportionalities)

April 1, 2017

Design Exchange: Peace Memorial

Image Arch-490_Peace-Memorial1GroupAtNID

Karla Sierralta

Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor Karla Sierralta, together with her students: Calvin Bulan, Jason Hashimoto, Khan Meyer, Valerie Ribao, Malu Stanich and Morgan Wynne traveled to Japan and participated in a cultural and academic exchange with the Nagaoka Institute of Design. Students from both institutions collaborated and presented design proposals during an intensive two-week workshop that took place in both Nagaoka and Honolulu. The exchange was rooted on the recent commemoration of the 70th anniversary of peace between the nations of Japan and the United States and focused on the design of a dual physical memorial for sites in both cities celebrating this friendship and paving the way for future generations to embrace world peace.

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NID Professor Seisuke Watanabe explains the sites in Nagaoka

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Students collaborate during design workshop in Japan

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Students present their design work at NID

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Final student presentations at Charlot House in Honolulu

March 20, 2017

Professor David Rockwood Receives Fulbright Scholar Award

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David Rockwood

Professor David Rockwood has been selected by the presidentially appointed J. William Fulbright Scholarship Board for a Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar award to Vietnam.  Rockwood will undertake teaching and research at Danang University of Science & Technology in Danang, Vietnam during academic year 2017-18.

Rockwood will collaborate with students and lecturers in the Faculty of Architecture and the Faculty of Civil Engineering. The research will follow up from Rockwood’s Fulbright Specialist award in 2014 that focused on the examination of the existing Vietnamese housing stock, and evolution new techniques for constructing affordable and sustainable housing in the country. This year, Rockwood and his Vietnamese colleagues will design, build, and test wall assemblies for public housing with the goal of lowering cost and decreasing heat transfer.

The Fulbright Program, established by Senator J. William Fulbright in 1946, aims to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. The flagship international educational exchange program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Fulbright alumni have become heads of state, judges, ambassadors, cabinet ministers, CEOs, and university presidents, as well as leading journalists, artists, scientists, and teachers. They include 58 Nobel Laureates, 82 Pulitzer Prize winners, 31 MacArthur Fellows, 16 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients, and thousands of leaders across the private, public and non-profit sectors.

http://www.cies.org

February 27, 2017

“Flushing Our Future” ASLO 2017 Town Hall Event on Wastewater Treatment

Image water photo by meguro

Wendy Meguro and others

Assistant Professor

This town hall event will connect and engage scholars, other experts, community members, students and decision-makers in the examination of the status of wastewater treatment in Hawaiʻi.

 Hawaiʻi provides a tractable model from which to generate solutions to wastewater management in a world experiencing rapidly changing climate, population growth and ageing infrastructure.  Aging and failing cesspools, increasingly large episodic storms, and sensitive environments combine to create a “perfect storm,” a combination of factors that together result in unprecedented challenges in Hawaiʻi’s wastewater management. This leads to impacts on beaches and aquatic resources, difficulty pinpointing sources of waste contamination, homeowners burdened with upgrade costs, and difficulty navigating the waste treatment regulatory environment.

Multidisciplinary cluster faculty of the University of Hawai'i at Manoa focused on sustainability and community outreach will each provide their impressions and expertise on this issue forming, in aggregate, a thoughtful and reasoned foundation for identifying specific challenges and seeking applied solutions.  The event will include a presentation framing the challenges and current efforts, followed by small group brainstorm and discussion. 

LOCATION
Hawaii Convention Center (Room 306 A)
1801 Kalakaua Ave
Honolulu, HI 96815

February 9, 2017

Building Voices Design Festival Announced

BuildingVoices

April 22, 2017 @ the Hawai’i State Capitol

Official festival website:

https://www.buildingvoices.org/competition/

An ideas + action festival that collects diverse perspectives surrounding
DESIGN as a framework for addressing the challenges and opportunities
facing Hawai’i.

EVENTS include: a symposium, an
international design competition, a
traveling exhibition, a published book
and other design-focused initiatives.

EARTH DAY, SATURDAY APRIL 22, 2017:
a free symposium and exhibit will be open to the public. Other related events will be held throughout the month of April for National Architecture and Landscape Architecture Month.

VENUE: THE HAWAI’I STATE CAPITOL.
See the main website calendar for
other event locations.
We gathered community leaders,
government officials, students, faculty members, and designers to ask what
they felt the most pressing issues and
opportunity areas are for the future of Hawai’i. Five main themes emerged:

1. ECOLOGICAL RESILIENCE
2. RESOURCE INDEPENDENCE
3. HEALTHY CITIZENS
4. COMMUNITY MOBILITY
5. HOUSING FOR ALL

ALL VOICES are invited: community
members, citizen-experts, students,
artists, inventors, designers, architects, landscape architects, planners,
engineers, builders, developers,
and city and state officials.

 

February 2, 2017

2X2 - Ferraro Choi X Urban Works

Image 020917 Two By Two

EXHIBITION CONTINUES THROUGH SUMMER

December 11, 2016

AIAS National Recognizes UH Paper Architecture Night

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AIAS Hawaii

Paper Architecture Night
AIAS and AIAS Hawaii

AIAS has recognized the Hawaii chapter for our Paper Architecture Night with a great article on their website. For four years and running PAN has been a monthly staple of the Hawaii chapter, bringing students and professionals together in the School of Architecture courtyard for presentations, socializing and food. Congrats to all the members, past members and supporters of this highly active chapter who help keep PAN and the Hawaii chapter a success. 

December 7, 2016

Giant inflatable structures give students valuable experience

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Lance Walters

Giant inflatable structures, some two stories tall, took over part of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa campus at the end of the 2016 fall semester. It is the fourth straight year the inflatable, or pneumatic, structures popped up in the lawn between the School of Architecture and Hawaiʻi Hall.

The pneumatic structures were designed and built by 43 students taking Architecture 235, a second-year design studio course. The structures were made of sheets of plastic the students seamed together with soldering irons and clothing irons. Everyday household standing fans inflated the structures.

“Typically, in design school and architecture school, you don’t get to build full size projects,” said UH Mānoa architecture professor Lance Walters, who teaches the course. “This project involves designing through representation and then constructing them. This gives them a chance to learn more about the spaces they are actually designing.”

“It’s a different experience to actually see something built,” said UH Mānoa architecture student Keola Annino, who built on one of the seven structures, which were one to two stories high. “We’re only in our second year, first semester of our second year, so having the opportunity to build something is pretty awesome.”

The assignment was to create pop-up galleries to display projects from earlier in the semester. The projects on display were of schematic designs, the first phase of basic design. The students used technical drawings, computer renderings and collages to rethink and conceptualize lifeguard towers.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL ARTICLE

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